There’s no Such Thing as “Failure”


depositphotos_13984100-stock-illustration-cartoon-eager-student“Give an example of a company experiencing financial trouble because of its promotional strategy?” Asked the professor. I gave an example of a company I had worked for in Uganda. “Please do not give ridiculous answers from countries that do not qualify for advanced European MBA programs.” He responded. I knew that I was in trouble because the only business-related work experience I had was in Uganda. 

I was pursuing an MBA from the Greenwich School of Management, a branch of Hull University, Hull, UK. Most of my classmates were from Europe or at the least had experience working for European-based businesses. During the first semester I did poorly in the class assignments and presentations. I hardly made the required points to proceed to the next semester. The professors told me that if I didn’t learn about the European market, I would fail the degree. I had given myself a year to complete the program—acceptable by the college, because I didn’t have the extra money to pay for another year. 

I sought for advice from one of my professors. “I think I’m already a failure.” I said miserably. “You can never fail. You will only fail to know that you didn’t fail. Even when we think we’ve failed, we still acted but just didn’t achieve our goals as anticipated. And that’s not a failure. Failure is an illusion.” He responded. I looked at him almost cross-eyed. I had no clue about what he meant. Desperate, I got a part-time job in a library and buried myself in reading everything I could get my hands on about the European economy. Long story short, I completed the degree in a year, passed with distinction and my thesis, earned me a “student of the year award.”

Failure

Moral of the Story:

I thought I had failed, only to realize that the results of my first semester were propelling me to work harder. And I concur with my professor’s wisdom. We never fail. Failure is just a word we come up with to summarize a process that has nothing to do with the real meaning of the word. The dictionary defines the word failure as a lack of success or non-fulfillment. When you consider what success means you realize that what we consider as failure is far from the truth. Success is being able to move from point A to B, internally or externally. Success can also imply committing to a promise made for oneself or for others. Success can mean progressing or moving through a process even if we don’t get to the end. Therefore, “failure” has no place in defining our actions plus the results. 

It’s vital to understand that words as just that….words. Therefore, we shouldn’t be quick to define our emotions by recruiting words that do not necessarily reflect on our true emotions. Words can be limiting, misleading and/or mis-representative of the truth. Sometimes if not most, we can not define feelings because they are in-definitive in their nature. They have no shape, color, size or density — if we do not create visuals to represent them. So, the words we use to define feelings are just attempts to express ourselves. Just because you feel a certain way for not achieving a particular goal doesn’t mean that you are a failure. A conclusive definition of a feeling as a failure, is just a believed thought and nothing more.

A conclusive definition of a feeling as a failure, is just a believed thought and nothing more.  

Therefore, let’s be slow in defining our experiences or outcomes. Let’s hold back from assigning meanings to our feelings. Let’s become observers of our feelings and see how long they can hold the emotional space in which they dwell. Mostly, let’s remember that we are not our thoughts, feelings or experiences. We are more; we are different; we are undefinable. Moreover, we have an immeasurable power within us, as us, that can help our human conditioning release the delusional tendencies and mental, plus emotional struggles we create: struggles that are lies and not based on truths.

Love and light

http://www.tapthegood.com

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What are Challenges?


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When you are experiencing challenges ask yourself:

  1. Who is the experiencer of these challenges?
  2. Why is this experiencer experiencing these events as challenges?
  3. How did the experiencer come to a conclusion that these events are challenges?
  4. Is this experiencer perceiving these events from a place of fear or faith?
  5. And most importantly, ask, does the experiencer really have to experience these events at all?
  6. What can happen if this experiencer retracts their attention from what they perceive as challenges and instead focus on something more pleasant?

As you dwell on the answers of these questions you start discovering that what you perceive as challenges are simply events that need your attention to resolve or ignore—especially if you can’t do anything about them. From these mental and emotional states, you free yourself from the discomforting consequences of your perception.

http://www.tapthegood.com

 

How We Create Insanity: An Excerpt from my upcoming book – “The Sanity Warrior”


Quote-by-Moe

Insanity begins by creating stories that are delusional: delusional in the sense that we normally don’t have practical evidence of our conclusive thoughts. For instance, we predict our future based on what happened in the past, or based on stories of other people. We also base our future predictions on present experiences and conclude with certainty that our lives will manifest the same way they are manifesting now. What’s interesting is that as we engross our minds in these predictions, we develop profound beliefs about our futures, and just like magic, our futures manifest as we predicted. So, we literally create our present and future realities as we continue to emotionally and mentally visualize experiences rooted on false facts. And because we’ve been given the free-will to think and visualize as we please, we’ve also been given the power to create our realities. But we forget or neglect this truth and blame everyone and everything out of ourselves for our experiences. Yet, we create our own suffering: because suffering is a personal inner experience (call it an emotion) that we consciously or unconsciously choose to feel. 

To summarize the preceding precepts, we live insanely because we’ve forgotten who we truly are, and what we are capable of. We forget, or are never convinced that our thoughts are powerful—and that they create. We neglect that no one and nothing has power over our emotions, except our own choices. We forget the basic truth that we cannot control anyone else but ourselves. Moreover, people are always changing their approach towards everything they do. Today someone might be kind and loving, and tomorrow he/she could be rude and/or sad. The more comfortable we get with our environments and the people we deal with, the more we relax our guard and reveal what’s inside of us. What’s inside depends on the number, diversity and intensity of experiences that someone has had all their lives; the related beliefs they’ve developed about their lives, life, and the world in general, plus relationships. What’s inside each one of us is complex. Therefore, regardless of how knowledgeable anyone is in subjects like psychology and/or human behavior, he/she can never be at the same pace with what consistently influences people to perceive and act the way they do.

Unfortunately, we go about life trying to change people; blaming them for being who they are, expecting them to love and accept us for who we are; thinking that we have the power to influence their actions, and that they owe us what we want to experience. When we believe that anyone owes us what we want to experience, then we have literally given them the power to choose our experiences based on what they know. We gain this mentality when we forget or negate that we experience who are. There is nothing without perception; also implying that if you don’t perceive something that “thing” does not exist in your reality. Because perception is a projection, we perceive according to what we have already created in our inner worlds: what we believe, what we consistently think about, and the stories we’ve created.

Therefore, if you don’t perceive it, it doesn’t exist. That’s why sometimes when you are crying over something, other people could celebrate over it. And it’s because we are all different—we have different opinions. Hence, everyone is doing the best they can with the mental, emotional and spiritual resources they’ve created within themselves. This also implies that what people do is their business. It’s their idea of expression and experience. So, it is insane to stress over what people do; considering that we have a choice to perceive things as we want, or decide not to experience what we don’t want. It’s because of this gift of free-will that God awarded us that we have also created a world of sorts. Sorts, in that the experiences we all individually create are so drastically different; some are extremely pleasurable if perceived that way, and others, sorrowful. It takes more than wishful thinking to stay connected to our true nature: a nature that consistently reveals its uniqueness through the selection of our perceptions and hence experiences.

Stay tuned for the book release date….

http://www.tapthegood.com